All images copyright Marie Weimer. All rights reserved. 

Marie Weimer was born in Princeton, Illinois in 1993 and as a child moved to Colorado where she currently lives. In 2010, Weimer started her artistic studies at Pickens Technical College, where she found her love for photography. With this focus she continued her education at Rocky Mountain College of Art and Design where she received her BFA in 2015. During this time she explored other mediums and alternative processes, which heavily influenced her artistic style. This exploration started Weimer’s interest with unpredictable creative processes, a direction that became the foundation of her contemporary portfolio. 

Weimer’s current work is constructed on ideas of time, light, texture, and movement. Through these elements she produces atmospheric, obstructed images as well as grungy and corrosive sculptures. Her sculptural work is a comment on the abnormal and how people notice elements out of place with reality, while her photography highlights fleeting moments and reveals fragments of information at a given time.

Artist Statement
Currently my work involves elements of time, light, texture and movement. Each work has a layer of unpredictability within it since I become enveloped in the process while I create. My photography of late has focused on an atmospheric quality, capturing fragments of people in motion commenting on time and the amount of things we do or see within a day. It is often self-portraiture, which brings identity into the conversation and illustrates specific experiences. Having a sense of transparency and movement enhances my photography because it allows the moment to feel fleeting. Time is also a theme in my sculptural work, which focuses in contradicting expectations by creating rust on objects that normally would not rust. Rust is an indication of time passing and lack of up keeping, but it also has an intriguing context of decay. This work is a comment on how people notice things when they are different than usual and stop to think about why objects would be that way.

Photograph taken by tya Anthony (tyaanthony.com)

Photograph taken by tya Anthony (tyaanthony.com)